Independent Contractor vs. Employee, Hit List by Industry, 2016-2017

img_1044Are you on the hit list?

The highest concentration of independent contractor misclassification lawsuits during the past 12 months seem to be in these areas:

  • Agricultural workers
  • Beauty consultants (sales)
  • Cable installers
  • Car services (passengers, ride-hailing services)
  • Computer programmers
  • Construction workers
  • Consultants (various industries)
  • Couriers
  • Delivery drivers (food, goods, freight)
  • Exotic dancers (strippers)
  • Freelance writer/reporters/other journalism
  • Information technology workers
  • Installers (cabinets, appliances, windows, furniture)
  • Insurance sales representatives
  • Janitorial franchise owners (individuals)
  • Maintainance workers
  • Newspaper carriers
  • Performers (actors, cheerleaders, wrestlers)
  • Physicians
  • Property inspection services
  • Repair technicians
  • Sales representatives
  • Travel agents
  • Truck drivers
  • Yoga instructors

This list should not in any way suggest that the categories of workers in this list should be employees. That determination will depend on the facts in any given situation. All of these types of workers, however, have been plaintiffs in recent lawsuits alleging that they were misclassified as independent contractors and should have been deemed employees.

Companies who retain these types of workers as independent contractors should take proactive steps to evaluate the facts in these relationships, particularly under the variety of federal and state law tests that may apply. Companies should also remember that because different tests apply to different laws, workers may be properly classified as independent contractors under some laws and some tests, but may be deemed employees under other laws and other tests.

Strippers Have No Class, Judge Rules

We’ve seen lots of exotic dancer cases lately (clarification for my wife: seen lots of cases, not dancers) where the dancers — apparently this is the preferred legal term for strippers — claim they have been misclassified as independent contractors.

employment-class-action-blogMany of these claims have succeeded, but here’s an unusual way to lose class action status. This judge refused to certify the proposed class because of lack of experience of counsel. Thanks to my colleague, Greg Mersol (experienced counsel), for this post. Class dismissed!

Unlikely Lessons in Legal History, Edition 1.
Why lawyers use the term “exotic dancer” instead of stripper:

Lawyer’s Wife:  Were you out cavorting with strippers again?

Lawyer:  No.